Recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from RHS.


Apple Blossom Clematis

Trade Gallon
Item # 48592
$42.95
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armandii 'Apple Blossom'

Hundreds upon hundreds of 2½-inch blooms!
An award-winner worthy of the finest garden settings, 'Apple Blossom' is an extraordinary way to welcome spring! With unstoppable fragrance and bloom strength, it is an unforgettable landmark in the garden.

The show begins in mid-spring in most climates, when masses and masses of 2½-inch appleblossom-pink blooms open from rosy-pink buds. Strongly scented of vanilla, they perfume the entire spring garden, remaining for weeks against bronze-tinted new foliage.

The new foliage of this Clematis is interesting too. Although it becomes leathery, tough, and dark green, in spring it opens with bronze tints. This is an evergreen Clematis, so the new leaves appear as the old are passing, for a lovely two-tone effect.

'Apple Blossom' reaches 10 to 15 feet high and 5 to 8 feet wide. It is ideal to train up a trellis or arbor, festoon a fence or outbuilding, or even cover the garden floor. Recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from the RHS, this classic selection is very fast-growing. It prefers a bit of shade in all but the most northern locations. Pruning Group I. Zones 6-9.

Genus Clematis
Species armandii
Variety 'Apple Blossom'
Item Form Trade Gallon
Zone 6 - 9
Bloom Season Mid Spring - Late Spring
Clematis Pruning Group Group 1
Habit Vining
Plant Height 10 ft - 15 ft
Additional Characteristics Award Winner, Butterfly Lovers, Flower, Fragrance, Free Bloomer, Heirloom, Pruning Recommended, Rose Companions
Bloom Color Light Pink
Foliage Color Dark Green
Light Requirements Full Sun, Part Shade
Moisture Requirements Moist,  well-drained
Resistance Cold Hardy, Disease Resistant, Heat Tolerant, Humidity Tolerant, Pest Resistant
Soil Tolerance Clay, Normal,  loamy
Uses Border, Ground Cover, Outdoor, Vines and Climbers
Restrictions Canada, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands
Overall Rating: 5 Stars
Average Based on 1 Reviews Write a Review
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The Ramblers and Early Bloomers

Group 1 are the Clematis that bloom mostly on old wood (meaning the previous season's growth) and begin their flowering season in mid- to late spring.

The key to pruning Group 1 is that they don't require any pruning, but if you're going to do it, do it right after bloom. And, as long as you ruthlessly prune it right after flowering each year, you can cut off as much growth as you like. Whatever grows between the time you prune and the following spring probably won't bloom next year, but all the old wood will, and you can control the growth of ramblers beautifully that way. (In other words, if you want your Clematis to grow only 7 feet tall, for instance, prune it back to 7 feet right after it blooms. It will grow a bit more before winter, but the new growth won't bloom next spring — just the old 7 feet you wanted! Repeat this process every year and your Clematis will give you a perfect 7-foot column of blooms, season after season!)

The only other reason to prune your Group 1 Clematis is to remove any dead or diseased growth. If your Clematis has climbed a tall tree or sprawled over an outbuilding, prune any poor growth you can reach and let the rest fend for itself. If you've performed your first- and second-year pruning faithfully, your Clematis will be lush and many-stemmed, blooming close to the ground as well as farther up along its vigorous stems, and will look great year after year!

Once you know your Clematis's pruning number and get that first-year trim out of the way, keeping this woody climber looking its best and blooming like crazy is simple! A few minutes once a year will yield you armloads of flowers for many seasons, and you will continue to find new uses for Clematis, from hiding an unsightly fence to decorating your most formal garden art!

Shop Clematis Time to Prune? Group 2 Group 3
  • Butterflies like a lot of sunlight, so locate your garden in a sunny area.

  • If you live in a windy location, plant your butterfly-attracting plants near a building, fence, or hedge to protect them.

  • Plant a variety of nectar-rich plants, as well as shrubs and evergreens for shelter.

  • Since many butterflies and native flowering plants have co-evolved, try to put in some that are native to your area. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildlife Center provides lists of plants native to states and regions.

  • Certain colors are particularly attracting to butterflies – red, yellow, pink, purple, or orange blooms that are clustered or flat-topped, with a short flower tubes are especially attractive to adult butterflies.

  • Avoid using pesticides, especially around nectar-producing plants.

  • Provide a shallow source of water – try a birdbath with pebbles lining the bowl.

  • Place a rock in a sunny spot for butterfly basking and resting.

  • Create a "puddling area" by digging a shallow hole filled with compost or manure where rainwater will collect and release essential salts and minerals.

  • If you want butterflies to breed in your garden, put in some caterpillar food plants, such as parsley, milkweeds, asters, thistles, violets, clover, grasses, and Queen Anne’s Lace.

  • Since butterflies need nectar throughout the entire adult phase of their lives, try to create a design that will allow for a continuous bloom – when one stops blooming, another starts.
Clematis
Planting:

Set out plants immediately upon receipt spacing widely to allow for ultimate growth and spread. A rich, loose, well-drained soil that has been enriched is ideal; soil should be porous to allow for free run of the roots.

The rule of thumb is that clematis prefer shade at the roots (this can be provided by low growing plants or a cooling mulch), and sun at the tops. For this reason they do well interplanted among trees and shrubs, through which they easily grow. When planting, set a stake next to the plant for support.


Maintenance:

Water during periods of drought. Do not be discouraged if top growth is slow to appear; the roots must establish themselves before top growth occurs. For pruning purposes, Clematis can be divided into 3 groups. The first group blooms in the spring from buds set the previous season. Prune, when needed, after bloom. The second group blooms in early summer on short stems that come from buds set the previous season.

In March, remove dead wood and cut the remaining stems back to a pair of strong buds. The third group blooms on new growth. Therefore, prune all stems back to 12 inches from the ground each year in March. We also recommend a winter mulch. They also respond well to a topdressing of well aged manure or rich compost, preferably applied twice a year.


Zones:

Zones various

Tips for gardening in particularly hot, dry climates:


1. Water with a drip system whenever possible – soak the bed slowly and thoroughly to a depth of 10" to 12".

2. Watering deeply every 3 to 5 days is preferable to a shallow daily watering.

3. Water in the early morning, so foliage has time to dry.

4. Add a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch or similar material to aid in water retention and help keep the roots cool during hot weather.