Silvery seedheads follow the blooms, puffy and ethereal.


Golden Tiara Clematis

2-Quart
Item # 44320
$27.95
Buy 2+ at $23.95 ea
Buy 3+ at $22.95 ea
Item is sold out.

Clematis tangutica

This Chinese species is among the most floriferous in the family.
If you have not discovered Golden Tiara, as C. tangutica is familiarly known, you are in for a delightful surprise. Renowned for its free-flowering nature and very long season of bloom, this Chinese species adds a stylish new look to the Clematis garden with puffy lantern shaped blooms of brightest gold!

The flowers begin opening in midsummer, dangling freely from bright green foliage. The petal tips curl outward, creating a look like dozens of tiny parachutes landing in the garden! As they open further, they reveal a dark center. The show keeps coming through early fall in most climates!

Even after the blooms stop, it's hard to miss them, because C. tangutica immediately replaces them with very large, wispy seedheads of silver. Cut these for Everlasting arrangements or let them remain on the plant into winter, adding extraordinary texture and color. Very showy!

C. tangutica reaches 10 to 14 feet high and about 4 to 5 feet wide, a good size for climbing arbors and trellises as well as threading through climbing roses and open-habit shrubs. It thrives in full sun in the north, partial shade farther south, and like all Clematis, needs plenty of mulch or other natural protection to keep its roots cool.

Give this beautiful woody climber very fertile, well-drained soil and a bit of patience, for it will take a season or two to get established in your garden. Once it has made itself at home, however, the show is dependable and very long-lasting, year after year! Combine it with other Clematis for a spectacular effect, or let it climb in solitary splendor! Pruning Group II. Zones 4-9.

Genus Clematis
Species tangutica
Item Form 2-Quart
Zone 4 - 9
Bloom Season Mid Summer - Early Fall
Clematis Pruning Group Group 2
Habit Vining
Plant Height 10 ft - 14 ft
Additional Characteristics Butterfly Lovers, Flower, Free Bloomer, Long Bloomers, Pruning Recommended, Rose Companions
Bloom Color Gold
Foliage Color Medium Green
Light Requirements Full Sun, Part Shade
Moisture Requirements Moist,  well-drained
Resistance Heat Tolerant, Humidity Tolerant
Soil Tolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Border, Fall Color, Outdoor, Vines and Climbers
Restrictions Guam, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Canada, Hawaii

The Big-Flowered Summer Bloomers

Masses of frilly star-shaped blooms; big white snowflakes that blanket the garden twice a season; true-blue color for 4 solid months. The big-flowered, double, and otherwise showy Clematis varieties are among the very best for the garden, and you can master the annual pruning technique in about 3 minutes. First, make sure you've already done the special first- and second-year pruning. Then just maintain your Clematis's beauty as follows:

Group 2 Clematis blooms on "old wood," which simply means stems that grew last season or earlier. (This season's new stems — the ones that grow from spring till the summer bloom season begins — won't flower until next year.) Therefore, you don't want to prune too radically. The rule of thumb is that in late winter or earliest spring, cut back each stem about 6 to 8 inches, to right above the point where it branches. At this branching point, you should see a pair of little bumps. These are buds, and you want to keep them. Find all the branching stems on the Clematis and trim to just above those buds. (You may have read in gardening manuals: "Trim to a pair of strong buds." That's what this process is — the two buds right above the place where each stem branches are the "pair of strong buds" you're looking for! They're easy to see on the slender Clematis stems.)

Once you know your Clematis's pruning number and get that first-year trim out of the way, keeping this woody climber looking its best and blooming like crazy is simple! A few minutes once a year will yield you armloads of flowers for many seasons, and you will continue to find new uses for Clematis, from hiding an unsightly fence to decorating your most formal garden art!

Shop Clematis Time to Prune? Group 1 Group 3
  • Butterflies like a lot of sunlight, so locate your garden in a sunny area.

  • If you live in a windy location, plant your butterfly-attracting plants near a building, fence, or hedge to protect them.

  • Plant a variety of nectar-rich plants, as well as shrubs and evergreens for shelter.

  • Since many butterflies and native flowering plants have co-evolved, try to put in some that are native to your area. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildlife Center provides lists of plants native to states and regions.

  • Certain colors are particularly attracting to butterflies – red, yellow, pink, purple, or orange blooms that are clustered or flat-topped, with a short flower tubes are especially attractive to adult butterflies.

  • Avoid using pesticides, especially around nectar-producing plants.

  • Provide a shallow source of water – try a birdbath with pebbles lining the bowl.

  • Place a rock in a sunny spot for butterfly basking and resting.

  • Create a "puddling area" by digging a shallow hole filled with compost or manure where rainwater will collect and release essential salts and minerals.

  • If you want butterflies to breed in your garden, put in some caterpillar food plants, such as parsley, milkweeds, asters, thistles, violets, clover, grasses, and Queen Anne’s Lace.

  • Since butterflies need nectar throughout the entire adult phase of their lives, try to create a design that will allow for a continuous bloom – when one stops blooming, another starts.
Clematis
Planting:

Set out plants immediately upon receipt spacing widely to allow for ultimate growth and spread. A rich, loose, well-drained soil that has been enriched is ideal; soil should be porous to allow for free run of the roots.

The rule of thumb is that clematis prefer shade at the roots (this can be provided by low growing plants or a cooling mulch), and sun at the tops. For this reason they do well interplanted among trees and shrubs, through which they easily grow. When planting, set a stake next to the plant for support.


Maintenance:

Water during periods of drought. Do not be discouraged if top growth is slow to appear; the roots must establish themselves before top growth occurs. For pruning purposes, Clematis can be divided into 3 groups. The first group blooms in the spring from buds set the previous season. Prune, when needed, after bloom. The second group blooms in early summer on short stems that come from buds set the previous season.

In March, remove dead wood and cut the remaining stems back to a pair of strong buds. The third group blooms on new growth. Therefore, prune all stems back to 12 inches from the ground each year in March. We also recommend a winter mulch. They also respond well to a topdressing of well aged manure or rich compost, preferably applied twice a year.


Zones:

Zones various

Get the Best Blooms from your Clematis

You’ll find Clematis pruning groups for your specific variety listed in the descriptions in our catalog and online. Follow the pruning guidelines below to get the best bloom show out of your Clematis.

Clematis Pruning Guide

Group I:

(Bloom in early spring from buds set the previous season on old wood; doesn’t die back in winter)

Prune only when needed, after bloom in spring.


Group II:

(Usually includes rebloomers that produce flowers on old wood in late spring/early summer and often bloom again on new wood in late summer or fall)

In March, remove dead wood and cut the remaining stems 6 to 8 inches to a pair of strong buds.


Group III:

(Bloom on new wood in the summer and fall; dies to the ground over winter)


Each year in March, prune all stems back to a strong set of buds 12 inches from the ground.