Long-lasting in garden or vase!
87702-pk-6.jpgHypnotica® Rose Bicolor Dahlinova Dahlia Plant
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Hypnotica® Rose Bicolor Dahlinova Dahlia Plant

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Item # 87702-PK-6B
$18.95 ea
Buy 3+ at $17.50 ea
Buy 6+ at $16.75 ea
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Item # 87702-PK-6C
$18.95 ea
Buy 3+ at $17.50 ea
Buy 6+ at $16.75 ea
Item is sold out.
Now Shipping to All Zones
Item # 87702-PK-6D
$18.95 ea
Buy 3+ at $17.50 ea
Buy 6+ at $16.75 ea
Item is sold out.

Dahlia Dahlinova Hypnotica® Rose Bicolor

Perfect for cutting!
Huge, ultra-bright flowers that grow quickly and keep coming month after month are the hallmark of this exciting new Dahlia. Well-branched and tolerant of rain, heat, and mildew, these plants are lush and healthy, setting flowers on short stems that seldom need support.

This tender perennial is grown as an annual in most climates, but you can dig up the tuber before first frost and save it for replanting next year if you like. The Dahlinovas reach 12 to 24 inches high and jsut 12 to 15 inches wide, set with huge flowers over a long late spring through early fall season. Magnificent!

In addition to Rose Bicolor, there are also Lavender and Yellow colors. Try them all! Ideal for garden or container, they're simply a cut-flower lover's dream come true! Pack of 6.

Garden Fresh Express Shipping at No Extra Charge
When it's time for your plants to make their journey from our greenhouses to your doorstep, we take no chances with their health. Every plant receives Express (2-day) shipping at the more economical standard shipping rates, so that it arrives promptly, without enduring delays along the way.
Genus Dahlia
Variety Dahlinova Hypnotica® Rose Bicolor
Zone 9 - 11
Bloom Season Late Spring - Early Fall
Habit Upright
Plant Height 12 in - 24 in
Plant Width 12 in - 15 in
Additional Characteristics Bloom First Year, Butterfly Lovers, Double Blooms, Flower, Long Bloomers, Needs Deadheading, Repeat Bloomer, Rose Companions
Bloom Color Dark Red, Multi-Color, Yellow
Foliage Color Dark Green
Light Requirements Full Sun
Moisture Requirements Moist,  well-drained
Resistance Downy Mildew, Heat Tolerant, Powdery Mildew
Soil Tolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Beds, Border, Containers, Cut Flowers
Restrictions Canada, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands
Hypnotica® Rose Bicolor Dahlinova Dahlia PlantHypnotica® Rose Bicolor Dahlinova Dahlia Plant
  • Butterflies like a lot of sunlight, so locate your garden in a sunny area.

  • If you live in a windy location, plant your butterfly-attracting plants near a building, fence, or hedge to protect them.

  • Plant a variety of nectar-rich plants, as well as shrubs and evergreens for shelter.

  • Since many butterflies and native flowering plants have co-evolved, try to put in some that are native to your area. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildlife Center provides lists of plants native to states and regions.

  • Certain colors are particularly attracting to butterflies – red, yellow, pink, purple, or orange blooms that are clustered or flat-topped, with a short flower tubes are especially attractive to adult butterflies.

  • Avoid using pesticides, especially around nectar-producing plants.

  • Provide a shallow source of water – try a birdbath with pebbles lining the bowl.

  • Place a rock in a sunny spot for butterfly basking and resting.

  • Create a "puddling area" by digging a shallow hole filled with compost or manure where rainwater will collect and release essential salts and minerals.

  • If you want butterflies to breed in your garden, put in some caterpillar food plants, such as parsley, milkweeds, asters, thistles, violets, clover, grasses, and Queen Anne’s Lace.

  • Since butterflies need nectar throughout the entire adult phase of their lives, try to create a design that will allow for a continuous bloom – when one stops blooming, another starts.
Untitled Document Things You'll Need

Overwintering Cannas, Dahlias, Caladiums, Tuberous Begonias, and Elephant Ears


If you live in colder part of the country, many of the lush, tropical beauties we offer will be tender in your zone, unable to survive the winter. Often gardeners will simply grow these beautiful plants as annuals, just enjoying them for one season. But the serious plant enthusiast rises to the challenge and goes the extra mile to let these plants reach their full perennial potential. If you make the effort to overwinter your tender plants, you can enjoy an increasingly beautiful display every season, and your garden will be all the more elite for the inclusion of these exotic perennials.

One way to keep your tender plants growing is to keep them in a pot so that you can move them indoors or shelter them in a greenhouse. This option is easy and convenient, and lets your plants continue to slowly grow throughout the winter, but a greenhouse also involves some start-up costs and requires that your plants all be in containers.

 

1. Dig

Dig 12 inches from the plant's crown

Wait until the bloom show has ended and the foliage has started to die off, towards the end of fall. Your plants will tell you when it is time by dying back and going into dormancy. Once your plants are done for the season, take a pair of clean pruning shears and cut back the foliage to just above the ground (about 6 inches, depending on the plant's height). This will give the plant a clear signal that the season is over and it is time to go into dormancy, if it hasn't already. It is important to use a clean pair of shears to avoid introducing rot—rot is your biggest enemy throughout this process, so clean your shears with alcohol to be extra careful.

Now you are ready to dig up your tuber. Move about a foot away from the crown and dig down deep to get underneath of it. Be careful not to pierce the tubers, because again that can promote rot. Circle the plant, loosening up the soil, and then gently lift it out of the ground. Rinse off any remaining soil until you can see all the tubers hanging from the stalks. Cut off any tubers that look rotten, to keep the rot from spreading.

 

2. Divide

Divide the Tuber into Segments

Next it is time to divide up the plant. This will help it grow healthier next year, and it means that you get more specimens to grace your garden!

First identify the eyes—these can vary from species to species, but they look similar to the eyes of a potato, and this is where new growth will come from next year. Cut up the plant into segments, trying to leave the individual tubers as intact as possible, and make sure that each division has at least one eye.

 

 

3. Dry

Dry Your Tubers in a Box.

Now set the tubers out to dry. Leave them out at least 3 days until they are thoroughly dry. Placing them on cardboard can help. Getting the tubers dry will prevent them from rotting.

Lastly, you want to put your dried tubers away for the winter. A cardboard box, wooden box, or basket are all great storage places, as they allow some ventilation. Place the tubers in a medium, like wood chips, sand, or vermiculite, which will insulate and help to prevent rot. This medium should be just slightly moist to keep the tubers from drying out TOO much over winter.

Then place your box in a dark, cool place (50 degrees at most, 35 degrees at the least) over winter. A cellar, garage, basement, or even dark closet might work—if all else fails, set a small refrigerator to 45 degrees and store your overwinter plants there. Don’t forget to label your box so you know what varieties are in it! Check in on your tubers just a few times throughout the winter to make sure they are not rotting or getting too shriveled up. A little bit of shriveling is normal, but if they seem very dry, give them a spritz of water. Remember that the tuber stops "drinking" during dormancy, so they just need a small amount of water to keep them from completely drying out. And if you see signs of rot, throw those tubers out.



That is all there is to it! Next spring you should (fingers crossed) have more healthy plants than ever before, ready to provide you another long season of beauty! You can also get the jump on the season by starting your plants indoors about a month early. Start with a few hours of indirect sunlight and let them adjust slowly to light again before you plant them out.

 

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Tips for gardening in particularly hot, dry climates:


1. Water with a drip system whenever possible – soak the bed slowly and thoroughly to a depth of 10" to 12".

2. Watering deeply every 3 to 5 days is preferable to a shallow daily watering.

3. Water in the early morning, so foliage has time to dry.

4. Add a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch or similar material to aid in water retention and help keep the roots cool during hot weather.