Sweet Autumn Clematis

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Clematis terniflora


1-Quart
Item # 36282
Ships in Fall at the proper planting time for your zone. View schedule.
$22.95
Buy 3+ at $19.95 ea
Buy 6+ at $18.95 ea
The Sweet Autumn Clematis can grow into a veritable blanket of tiny white blooms that densely carpet vines with dark green foliage. This energetic climber is surprisingly fragrant and blooms from late summer well into late fall. The star-shaped blooms are tiny, ½- to 1-inch blossoms and are powerfully fragrant. After the flowers are spent, Sweet Autumn produces silvery seedheads that are perfect for floral arrangements with a wintry theme.

The Sweet Autumn Clematis is extremely vigorous and establishes itself quickly. It is reliable and grows more productive over the years. This plant is deer resistant and heat tolerant and is adaptable to different types of soil, such as clay, loamy or normal soil. It is an enthusiastic climber and can grow 20 to 30 feet in height and 6 feet in width. Sweet Autumn Clematis is an exceptional outdoor plant and makes an ideal border. It can also be guided over a fence or wound through a rose bush for a striking look.

Overall Rating: 5 Stars
Average Based on 3 Reviews Write a Review
Outstanding performer
Evelyn T from IA wrote (September 15, 2016):
This is a fantastic clematis! It has covered my privacy fence 8' high (plus the other side) and 16' wide. And the fragrance is outstanding!
Awesome plant
Jacinda from MS wrote (May 14, 2015):
I've had this plant for several years. Very fragrant and fast growing. I prune mine to 12" in March and it grows back in no time. One of my favorites in our landscaping.
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Oak Grove Designs from SC wrote (March 29, 2015):
As a landscape designer, this is one of my favorite plants for adding late season bloom and fragrance. Establishes quickly, makes a huge mound in a season.

The Late Bloomers
Unlike other types of Clematis, Group 3 blooms on "new wood" (which means the current season's growth; if you keep last year's flowering stems on the plant, they won't set buds). So, unless you live in a climate where your Clematis naturally dies back to the ground in winter, you must prepare yourself to whack off all the old stems in late winter/early spring down to about a foot from the ground, just above the place where the new season's growth begins.

"Forget it!" I hear you cry, remembering how you patiently helped your Clematis twine up the mailbox post last spring and were rewarded with a bloom show like none you'd ever experienced before in your life. I know; it seems harsh, especially for those of us in the south, who aren't used to plants that die back completely, then pop up again in spring more vigorous than ever. But if you'll take my word and remove all the old growth until you're left with a couple of stems about 12 inches from the ground, you won't be sorry. Look for the place where the stem changes color a bit — that will be where last season's growth began. Leave just an inch or two of that new color, cutting away the rest.

Once you know your Clematis's pruning number and get that first-year trim out of the way, keeping this woody climber looking its best and blooming like crazy is simple! A few minutes once a year will yield you armloads of flowers for many seasons, and you will continue to find new uses for Clematis, from hiding an unsightly fence to decorating your most formal garden art!

Shop Clematis Time to Prune? Group 1 Group 2

Tips for gardening in particularly hot, dry climates:


1. Water with a drip system whenever possible – soak the bed slowly and thoroughly to a depth of 10" to 12".

2. Watering deeply every 3 to 5 days is preferable to a shallow daily watering.

3. Water in the early morning, so foliage has time to dry.

4. Add a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch or similar material to aid in water retention and help keep the roots cool during hot weather.