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Always and Forever® Hybrid Tea Rose

Always and Forever® Hybrid Tea Rose

Rosa 'JACelvet' PPAF


2-Quart
Item # 33060
As classic and romantic as love itself, Always and Forever™ exudes a classic beauty, reminiscent of nostalgic roses of yesteryear. Nothing rivals the beauty of a long-stemmed, ruby-red rose, and that's exactly what you'll get with Always and Forever®. The blossoms truly are so richly colored and velvety looking, you won't be able to resist the urge to reach out and touch them, just to see if they're real!

This popular hybrid tea rose reaches a height and width of up to 5½ feet, making it an ideal specimen plant for large containers on the patio as well as a standout in the rose garden! The elegant blooms grace the landscape in flushes throughout the season, from early summer until late summer. Because of its exceptional beauty and fantastic garden performance, Always and Forever® was awarded the honor of being named our 2011 Rose of the Year®, and once you grow it in your garden, you understand exactly why.

Each elegant, large, pointed, ovoid bud slowly unfurls to reveal a gorgeous mildly fragrant, 5-inch, high-centered bloom comprised of 26 to 40 petals that lasts and lasts in the vase. With a tall growth habit and dark green, glossy, disease-resistant foliage, it also makes an excellent landscape plant. Treat yourself to decades of romantic beauty and superb performance with Always and Forever®!

This rose performs best in average, well-drained soil in full sun. Prune hybrid tea roses to half height or 18 to 20 inches above the ground in early spring. Zones 5-9.

Bareroot or Container?

World's Finest Roses

Have you browsed through your favorite gardening catalog or website looking for the newest roses to plant in your garden and wondered whether it would be best to choose bareroot roses or those in nursery pots? Or does it matter? If you’re like most rose gardeners, this question has come up at one point or another. And we want to help you find the answer as to what’s the best for you and your garden.


Bareroot Roses

Bareroot

Bareroot roses are an inexpensive and easy option for early-season planting. In fact, late winter is the best time to plant. Bareroot roses meet the highest industry standards. They arrive dormant, which makes them ideal for planting. The roots get to acclimate to native soil, as opposed to the packaged soil. And of course, since they aren't in soil when you get them, there’s no mess to contend with.


Bareroot roses may look dead, with their brown roots and dormant stem, but plants that arrive this way actually have the advantage of being able to focus their energies on strong root development rather than having to support an extensive growth of leaves during planting, which is very stressful.

You can plant your bareroot roses earlier in the growing season as well, since there aren't any leaves to get nipped back by frost. They can typically be planted as early as six weeks before your area’s last frost date in the spring. Since they don’t have to provide water to leaves or flowers, they usually establish quickly.


Container

Container roses should typically be planted in late spring and fall. They’re easy to plant (all you need is a trowel), and they provide instant gratification, as they aren't dormant and will have buds within a few short weeks, if they don’t when they arrive. They’re also perfect for transplanting into decorative containers and make an attractive gift.


Container roses are usually nicely leafed out, and may even have flowers on them, which is a great way for you to know when you purchase them what they’re going to look and smell like. As you can see, there are advantages to both bareroot or container roses, so whichever you decide is the best for your garden, we feel certain you’ll become a lifelong rose lover, if you aren't already!