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Veterans Honor® Hybrid Tea Rose

Veteran's Honor® Hybrid Tea Rose

Rosa 'JACopper'


36-Inch Bareroot Tree
Item # 35822
One of the most magnificent red roses ever is a fitting tribute to the men and women who've served our country. Plump pointed, ovoid buds unfurl into huge, 5½-inch high-centered blossoms consisting of 25 to 30 bright, true red petals. As the raspberry-scented flowers mature, their bright color is softened by overtones of pastel pink. The fragrant flowers appear in flushes throughout their early summer to late summer season and last up to two weeks in the vase, standing proudly on strong 18- to 22-inch stems!

The plant itself grows to about 5 feet high and 3 to 4 feet wide, cloaked in lovely dark green foliage.

This rose performs best in medium-moisture, slightly acidic, well-drained loam in full sun. Make sure the plant has good air circulation, as this promotes vigorous and healthy growth and helps prevent disease. A layer of mulch during the summer months helps to retain moisture, keep roots cool, and discourage the growth of weeds.

It should be pruned in the spring, with the removal of old canes and dead wood. Cut back canes that cross each other. Gardeners in warmer climates will want to cut the remaining canes by one-third, while those in colder climates will probably need to trim it a bit more.

Bareroot or Container?

World's Finest Roses

Have you browsed through your favorite gardening catalog or website looking for the newest roses to plant in your garden and wondered whether it would be best to choose bareroot roses or those in nursery pots? Or does it matter? If you’re like most rose gardeners, this question has come up at one point or another. And we want to help you find the answer as to what’s the best for you and your garden.


Bareroot Roses

Bareroot

Bareroot roses are an inexpensive and easy option for early-season planting. In fact, late winter is the best time to plant. Bareroot roses meet the highest industry standards. They arrive dormant, which makes them ideal for planting. The roots get to acclimate to native soil, as opposed to the packaged soil. And of course, since they aren't in soil when you get them, there’s no mess to contend with.


Bareroot roses may look dead, with their brown roots and dormant stem, but plants that arrive this way actually have the advantage of being able to focus their energies on strong root development rather than having to support an extensive growth of leaves during planting, which is very stressful.

You can plant your bareroot roses earlier in the growing season as well, since there aren't any leaves to get nipped back by frost. They can typically be planted as early as six weeks before your area’s last frost date in the spring. Since they don’t have to provide water to leaves or flowers, they usually establish quickly.


Container roses

Container

Container roses should typically be planted in late spring and fall. They’re easy to plant (all you need is a trowel), and they provide instant gratification, as they aren't dormant and will have buds within a few short weeks, if they don’t when they arrive. They’re also perfect for transplanting into decorative containers and make an attractive gift.


Container roses are usually nicely leafed out, and may even have flowers on them, which is a great way for you to know when you purchase them what they’re going to look and smell like. As you can see, there are advantages to both bareroot or container roses, so whichever you decide is the best for your garden, we feel certain you’ll become a lifelong rose lover, if you aren't already!