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39970.jpgZephirine Drouhin Climbing RoseZephirine Drouhin Climbing Rose
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Zephirine Drouhin Climbing Rose

2-Quart
Item # 39970
$24.95
Buy 3+ at $22.95 ea

'Zephirine Drouhin'

This classic old-fashioned climber offers big semi-double blooms of bright pink, peaking in spring and fall.
Introduced in 1868, 'Zephirine Drouhin' is a romantic, fantastically fragrant, old-fashioned Rose that is still one of the most popular Climbing Roses today, especially in Europe. No Modern Rose has been able to exceed it for sheer performance and season-long bloom.

Peaking in spring and fall, the loose, semi-double blossoms of vivid cerise-carmine provide outstanding mass effect. Each bloom is about 4 inches across, opening from a long, pointed bud and made up of 20 to 30 richly colored petals that are infused with a strong damask scent.

The plant grows vigorously to 15 to 20 feet high and 4 to 5 feet wide and, remarkable for any Rose, performs well in shade! It's an excellent choice for north-facing walls and areas with little sunlight.

The rich, dark green foliage (coppery-purple when young) is very mildew-resistant, and the canes are thornless, making it great for planting where traffic is heavy or children are nearby. This classic, time-tested climbing rose is the perfect choice to train over a trellis or porch, or trim into a formal hedge. Plant in moist, well-drained, loamy soil. Zones 5-9.

Genus2 Rosa
Variety 'Zephirine Drouhin'
ItemForm 2-Quart
Zone 5 - 9
BloomStartToEnd Late Spring - Early Fall
Habit Climbing
PlantHeight 15 ft - 20 ft
PlantWidth 4 ft - 6 ft
BloomSize 3 in - 4 in
AdditionalCharacteristics Flower, Fragrance, Thornless
BloomColor Magenta, Pink, Rose
BudShape Long, Pointed
FoliageColor Glossy, Medium Green
Fragrance Damask, Strong
LightRequirements Full Sun, Part Shade
Resistance Powdery Mildew
SoilTolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Ornamental, Outdoor, Vines and Climbers
Restrictions Canada, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands
Zephirine Drouhin Climbing RoseZephirine Drouhin Climbing RoseZephirine Drouhin Climbing Rose
Overall Rating: 5 Stars
Average Based on 3 Reviews Write a Review
Zephirine Drouhin Rose
Deb from AZ wrote (March 11, 2013):
I planted this 20 years ago on the wall of my storage room in Mesa, AZ. Morning sun and afternoon shade. It was spectacular, vigorous, fragrant. Will try it here in Ely, NV, but suspect the harsh winter will kill it.
Beautiful in dappled shade!
Nancy from UT wrote (April 06, 2012):
This is the only rose I've ever seen that does well in open shade. I've planted it on a trellis in the space between two houses. It gets morning sun but shade the majority of the day. The rose has been in this spot for 15 years and it is thriving! When I open the windows on that side of the house, it fills the rooms with that wonderful old-rose fragrance! I am buying another to put on the other side of the house. I highly recommend this lovely rose.
LOVE this rose!
Sara from TX wrote (January 27, 2012):
This climbing rose smells soooo good. I recently moved and had to leave it, sadly. I will definitely order another one! Thornless--big plus!
Whether you’re deadheading, removing dead wood, or performing an annual pruning, make sure your cuts are no more than ¼ inch (5 mm) above a bud, and slope the cut away from the bud, to prevent water from collecting on it.
  • Your cuts should always be clean, so keep your pruning shears sharp, and use pruning tools that are appropriately sized to whatever size stems you are cutting.

  • To encourage an open-centered form, cut to an outward-facing bud. To encourage upright growth on roses with a spreading habit, prune a few of the stems to inward-facing buds.

  • Prune any dieback to the healthy, white pith.

  • Remove dead or diseased stems, as well as any that cross or are spindly.

  • Your goal should be to have well-spaced stems that allow for a free flow of air.

  • If pruning an established plant, remove any old wood that is flowering poorly, and use a saw to get rid of old stubs that are no longer producing new shoots.

  • Other than climbing roses, you should prune newly planted roses hard, which encourages vigorous shoot production.

  • When removing suckers, trace them back to the roots from which they are growing, and simply take them off.
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    Rose

    Planting:

    Upon receipt, a bare-rooted Rose should be immersed in water for several hours. Never let the plant dry out after soaking and before planting. If planting is to be delayed several days, keep moist (especially the roots) and store in a cool place. If plant ing is to be delayed a week or more, “heel in” the plant, temporarily cov er ing the roots with moist soil or peat. Plant in the spring in a location with at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Roses are widely tolerant of soils, but happiest in a moisture retentive, well-drained soil slightly on the acid side and enhanced with humus or decayed organic matter.

    Space 4 to 10 feet apart, depending on ultimate spread or use. In areas where temperatures drop below 0° F., set so that the bud union (if plants are budded) is 2 inches below ground level; in warmer areas, set so that the union is above or just about at ground level. Meidiland roses are grown on their own roots, and therefore, are not budded. Mound additional soil or compost around canes to a height of 2 inches from the cane ends to prevent moisture loss. When buds start to swell, usually about 7 to 10 days after planting, remove mounded soil or mulch. We recommend a 2-inch year-round mulch over the soil surface. A strong stake is advisable for the taller growing varieties if planted in a location subject to wind.


    Maintenance:

    Many varieties display resistance to pests and disease; however, precautionary mea sures are advisable on a reduced schedule. Fertilize with a standard rose fertilizer after growth has com menced and periodically (as per instructions) up until late summer.

    (Fertilizing in the fall can cause soft growth and subject plants to winter injury.) Prune Hybrid Teas, Floribundas, English, and other modern shrub types in early spring before new growth starts, removing any dead, weak or old wood and cutting the plant by 2/3 to 1/2 its length. Taller, more vigorous varieties can be pruned less to allow them to develop an attractive shrub form; however, flowering may be less continuous. Climbers should be pruned in early spring to remove only a few of the older, thicker canes that no longer flower well.

    The remaining canes can be lightly pruned for shaping as needed. Old-fashioned types that don’t rebloom should only be pruned in midsummer after flowers fade to remove the older, thicker canes and shorten the remaining canes as needed for shaping.


    Winter care for tree roses:

    Once the night temperature averages below freezing for 3 to 4 weeks and the plants become dormant, trim the top canes about 5 or 6 inches. In zones 6 & 7, wrap the entire plant with strips of either burlap or stem-wrapping paper (like used on tree trunks). begin wrapping from the bottom of the trunk, overlapping the layers in and around the graft and the stems at the top of the plant, until only the tips are exposed.

    In zones 4 & 5, wrap trunk and top as described and then staple a cylinder of tar paper around trunk. Then wrap a larger piece of burlap over the entire top of the rose, tying it tightly to keep it in place. Finally, mound 6 to 8 inches of soil around the base of the plant.